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Webinars

View these recent webinars for free:

Building Resilience through Eco-Crafts Presenter: Shelene Codner (Available until May 2nd)

Invasive Species: Towards a Deeper Understanding Presenters: Lisa Zinn and Jonathon Schramm (Available until May 10th)

Why Risky Play is So Important for Children Presenter: Mariana Brussoni (Available until May 17th)

You must be a Green Teacher subscriber to access webinars older than 30 days.

If you have never used Blackboard Collaborate or are having trouble launching the webinars, please see troubleshooting options. For Mac users, click here. As a last resort, try contacting technical support.

Upcoming webinars:

SundayHarrisonPromising Practices for School Food Gardens

Presenter: Sunday Harrison

Tuesday, April 28th 2015 7:30-8:30pm EST

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School food gardens have become popular once again, while also becoming more diverse. From a single raised bed in an underused green space, to large-scale mini-farms that are part of Community Shared Agriculture programs, they are as unique as the school communities they inhabit. In this session, Sunday will share some common successes and challenges.  While some school boards are very supportive, others wish school gardens would just go away. As a result, it is important for everyone to have a better understanding of what makes a successful school garden project. This webinar will also address crop selection for schools, ties to student nutrition and enviro-education programs, summer strategies, links to academic subjects, the role of community partners, and enabling policies at school boards.

Sunday Harrison is the founder and program director at Green Thumbs Growing Kids, a non-profit organization in Toronto, Ontario. Her non-profit is celebrating its 15th year of operating school gardens and community greenhouses.  She has a Masters of Food and Sustainability Education Practice, a certificate in Landscape Architecture, and consults widely on program design for children’s gardens.

Alice and MelissaAddressing Aquatic Invasives

Presenters:  Melissa Doubek, Alice Holcomb and Bob Thomson

Thursday, October 1st 2015 7:30-8:30pm EST

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Tackling aquatic invasives presents special challenges for educators. Bob Thomson uses inquiry methods with a place-based format to ensure that students are participants in the educational process rather than observers. He’ll describe the grade 5 research programs he developed to conduct population analyses of individual invasive species in his local watershed and to use underwater robots to study the impact of invasive mussels on shipwrecks.  Alice Holcomb and Melissa Doubek will describe the activities they use in their River Rats summer program to help younger students learn about invasive species.

BobThompsoonMelissa Doubek is a Biology teacher and AP Psychology teacher at Alpena High School, in Alpena Michigan. She and Alice Holcomb co-founded and co-direct the River Rats Summer Science Program for children ages 5-10. Alice is an elementary reading specialist, who worked previously as a nature guide at a recreation area and as a surveyor for the National Forest Service. Both Alice and Melissa have been members of the Alpena Wildlife Sanctuary Board for many years.  Bob Thomson has been developing environmental research projects with his students for the past ten years from third grade to twelfth grade. His students have researched the impact of invasive mussel on shipwrecks with underwater robots and conducted population analysis on individual invasive species in the Thunder Bay watershed.

liebermanMaking the Next Generation Science Standards Work for Us

Presenter: Gerry Lieberman

Tuesday, October 6 2015 7:30-8:30pm EST

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The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), are in early stages of implementation in 13 states. These new standards represent a golden opportunity to more effectively connect environment concepts and content into standards-based science education. The implementation represents a dramatically different approach to science education, breaking new ground by incorporating three-dimensional instructional strategies. This substantial change requires the deep integration of “Disciplinary Core Ideas,” “Crosscutting Concepts,” and “Science and Engineering Practices.”  A completely new strategy, that no longer focuses on students reading about science or observing their teachers, rather “having students do science.” This webinar will focus on a discussion of effective strategies for integrating environmental content into the implementation of the NGSS. Dr. Lieberman has developed these strategies while contributing to the writing of California’s new “Science Framework”-the document that will guide classroom implementation and the development of new textbooks and other instructional materials.

Gerald Lieberman is an internationally-recognized authority on school improvement using natural and community surroundings as interdisciplinary contexts for education. He led the development of the EIC Model™, and the development of California’s EEI Curriculum. In 1995 Dr. Lieberman founded and has since directed the State Education and Environment Roundtable, a cooperative endeavor of departments of education in 16 U.S. states. Dr. Lieberman is the principal author of Closing the Achievement Gap: Using the Environment as an Integrating Context for Learning, a ground-breaking, national study that received an award from the National Environmental Education and Training Foundation for “bringing environmental learning into the mainstream of American K-12 education.” He has designed and coordinated curriculum development programs in the United States, Costa Rica, Honduras, Colombia and Argentina. He lives in San Diego, California.