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Webinars

View these recent webinars for free:

Engaging (Urban) Youth in Outdoor Education (Presenter: Keith Williams)

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Upcoming webinars:

Taking Kids to the CommuCoulternity

Presenter: Bob Coulter

Wednesday, January 28th 2015 7:30-8:30pm EST

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It takes a lot more energy, persistence, and vision to take your kids past the scripted curriculum and engage them in real-world, community-based work. In this information-packed webinar, Bob Coulter will be sharing his own experiences based on 30 years of direct work with kids, along with insights from two National Science Foundation-funded research projects he led that explored the ways in which teachers who get their kids out in the community are different: How they see their jobs, how they see learning, and how they see childhood. If you’re getting out in the community, you’re a star. Come see what makes you special, and pick up some research-based tips to expand your practice.

Bob Coulter is director of the Litzsinger Road Ecology Center, a division of the Missouri Botanical Garden. The Center is home base for a research and development group exploring ways to support place-based education, integration of technology with environmental experiences, and nature-based approaches to character development. The Center also partners with local environmental groups on urban ecology research and restoration projects. In an earlier life Bob was an award-winning elementary school teacher in Atlanta, Memphis, Boston, and St. Louis. His new book No More Robots: Building Kids Character, Competence, and Sense of Place was published recently by Peter Lang. 

 

zinn and schramm

Invasive Species: Towards a Deeper Understanding

Presenters: Lisa Zinn and Jonathon Schramm

Thursday, February 12 2015 7:30-8:30pm EST

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Invasive species provide an exciting story for environmental educators.  We have a villain (the bad invasives) and a victim (the poor helpless native species). Although this portrayal might capture a student’s attention, what is often lacking are the deeper ecological principles that come in to play. We will explore several myths often presented in the teaching about invasive species, and we explore alternative teaching scenarios that can be used as alternatives to these myths that can help students understand these deeper ecological principles.

Lisa Zinn teaches in the Sustainability and Environmental Education Department at Goshen College, in Goshen Indiana.  She has worked in various aspects of environmental education for 18 years and currently teaches Natural History to students obtaining their Master’s degree in Environmental Education at Merry Lea Environmental Learning Center of Goshen College. Jonathon Schramm also teaches in the SEED department at Goshen College and at Merry Lea.  Among other courses, Jonathon teaches Principles of Environmental Education for the same graduate program in Environmental Education and Sustainability and Regeneration and Environmental Problem Solving to undergraduate students.

VoyerChandlerCitizen Science Tackles Invasive Species

Presenters: Christine Voyer and Jeff Chandler

Wednesday, February 25 2015 7:30-8:30pm EST

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Jeff will share news about EE Week, including examples of how schools and national parks across the US are partnering to tackle invasive species through citizen science projects. From creeping vines to munching beetles to pinching crabs, invasive species are on the move. Monitoring the spread and mitigating the impacts invasive species wreak can be daunting tasks for scientists and managers. They need classrooms and communities to help. As students and community members. contribute observations and expertise to invasive species citizen science efforts, they learn about local ecosystems, engage in science practices, and use 21st century skills like collaboration and problem solving. In this webinar, Christine Voyer will share resources and the steps needed to help engage.

Christine Voyer is science education program manager for the Vital Signs program at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. She supports educators through professional development and curriculum development, and works with students and citizens on the ground and through the program’s website. Through Vital Signs, she is excited to help participants experience the fun, creativity, and critical importance of science. She is driven by a commitment to provide relevant and authentic experiences that inspire and empower learners to make a difference in the world. She has a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resource Management and Master of Arts in Teaching, both from Cornell University, and a background in science research and teaching.  Jeff Chandler is the Education Program Associate for the National Environmental Education Foundation in Washington, DC. This webinar is co-sponsored by the National Environmental Education Foundation in conjunction with EE Week.

JessicaKakneviciusEnvirothon – what? why? how?

Presenter: Jessica Kaknevicius

Thursday, February 26th, 2015 7:30-8-30pm EST

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Envirothon is one of North America’s largest outdoor environmental competitions – reaching over 500,000 students each year in 57 US states and Canadian provinces. The program aims to give high school students the opportunity to directly interact with the natural world and learn important skills directly from those working in the natural resources. With many students becoming disconnected from the environment, this program offers a new way for teenagers to get engaged and explore potential future career pathways. Learn how you can get involved in Envirothon, and what it can do for your students.

Jessica Kaknevicius has worked at Forests Ontario (previously the Ontario Forestry Association) since 2009, building the organization’s education and awareness programs. Her current focus is to dispel myths and broaden the understanding of sustainable forest management. Above all, Jessica is passionate about directly engaging youth and the public in learning about forest resources. She is the secretary for the Forest History Society of Ontario and a Young Conservation Professional graduate. Jessica has previously worked in community tree planting and restoration work, sustainable forest management auditing and research. She holds a Masters of Forest Conservation and an Honours Bachelor of Science from the University of Toronto.  

MB headshot Oct 2012Popping the Bubble Wrap for Child Health

Presenter: Mariana Brussoni

Tuesday, March 10th 2015 7:30-8:30pm EST

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Do we overprotect our children? Might our attempts to keep children safe actually do more harm than good? This webinar will consider these questions and what we might be able to do to restore balance. Mariana will share some tools for talking to parents, educators and others about the importance of risk taking, and will provide an example from her research showing the effects of good play space design on children’s behaviour.

Dr. Mariana Brussoni is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia and with the British Columbia Injury Research & Prevention Unit. She is a developmental psychologist investigating parents’ perceptions of children’s risk engagement and safety, the influence of nature-based challenging play on child health and development, and promoting developmentally appropriate opportunities for children’s risky play.

StaniforthInvasive Species Learning Options

Presenter: Sue Staniforth

Tuesday, March 24th 2015 7:30-8:30pm EST

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Invasive species are a serious issue world-wide, representing the second greatest threat to global biodiversity after habitat loss, and costing governments and communities tens of billions of dollars in control efforts. Unlike many large scale environmental issues, students and youth groups can usually do something about invasive species and in a hands-on, experiential way. In this webinar, Sue will review a variety of educational strategies and fieldwork planning tools that support young people tackling invasive species locally. She will also highlight some activities that engage students in identifying, surveying and mapping native and invasive species, investigating the impacts of invasive species on local ecosystems, economy, and cultures, and developing effective action projects.

Sue Staniforth is the Education and Outreach Coordinator for the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia, a non-profit society that helps coordinate and unite a wide variety of stakeholders in the struggle against invasive species. With over 25 years of experience as a biologist, educator and curriculum developer, she has developed over a dozen learning resources on topics that range from Garry Oak ecosystems to outdoor classrooms to invasive species resources. She has developed training courses for parks, forestry and utilities workers and Master Gardeners, and delivered hundreds of teacher professional development workshops both provincially and nationally.

TrashShellythumbnailBuilding Resilience through Eco-Crafts

Presenter: Shelene Codner

Wednesday, April 1st 2015 7:30-8:30pm EST

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Participating in upcycling and other environmental craft activities provides students with visual examples of sustainability and allows educators to model resilience and adaptability. We all need resilience in order to bounce back from stressful and sometimes life changing experiences.  This presentation introduces Kenneth Ginsburg’s “7 Cs of Resilience” and how eco-craft activities help young people combine the mental, emotional and physical skills they need to manage their lives and respond to the events that occur.

Shelene Codner is an Area Resource Specialist for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources Financial and Business Assistance group for 12 Iowa Counties along the I-35 Corridor.   Previously, she was worked in recycling education and earned several awards for her work.  Her reports and articles have appeared in national publications and she is the author of a children’s book written in honor of her father that is entitled If I Were A Little Guy.  Shelly is also a Master Gardener and lives on a farm in rural Iowa.